Global Red Power: Fourth World Resurgent, Glen Coulthard’s Antipode Lecture

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Naomi Oreskes on “Giant Power: Technology, Energy, and the Beginnings of Post-Truth America”

John Borrows and Val Napoleon: The role of the sacred in Indigenous law and reconciliation

Tania Li: Commons, Co-ops, and Corporations: Assembling Indonesia’s 21st century land reform

Fully Funded PhD: Water Security in Cape Town

Cameron Harrington and I have received full funding for a PhD student interested in the politics and ethics of water security in Cape Town. Details of the call can be downloaded here. Please circulate to those who may be interested; happy to answer any questions as they arise. Here are the brief details:

• Full funding (international tuition + stipend + visa costs + travel) for a student from a DAC nation eligible to receive ODA funding to pursue a PhD at Durham University for three years in either the School of Government and International Affairs or the Department of Geography

• The application deadline is short: AUGUST 31, 2018

• The start date is: FEBRUARY 2019Durham GCRF CDT Water Security PhD Advert p1.jpg

Durham GCRF CDT Water Security PhD Advert

 

Andreas Malm: In Wilderness is the Liberation of the World

If you have been following Andreas Malm’s work, such as his latest book The Progress of This Storm, you’ll be familiar with his latest project of bringing realism back to environmental thought in combination with his view of Marxism. I don’t think that, at least in his book, the criticisms are always as precise as they ought to be, which leads to some easier dismissals of other scholars than one might expect. Nevertheless, even if you aren’t a Marxist (or his version of a Marxist) several of his critiques are in the ballpark:

J. Baird Callicot: Environmental Ethics in the Anthropocene

Ethics in the Anthropocene: in conversation with Dale Jamieson, Emma Marris, and Jedediah Purdy

Whose land is it anyway? Open access book on decolonialism in Canada

whose land is it anyways

 

This is a fantastic, and timely, open-access book from some of Canada’s leading thinkers on Indigenous relations to land, law, education, and much else. There’s no simple way to capture the variety of the contributions in this decolonial handbook, except to say they are all worth reading. Download the PDF here: McFarlane and Schabus Whose land is it anyway 2018

New Paper! Financialization and the water-energy-food- climate nexus

I’m delighted to announce that my latest paper, co-authored with Nate Matthews, is now out in Geoforum.

It is free via this link until April 28, or copy and paste: https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1WhDz3pILM31k (after that it is available for free by emailing me or, if you have a subscription to the journal, the permanent link is here).

From State to System: Financialization and the Water-Energy-Food-Climate Nexus

Here is the abstract:

The water-energy-food-climate nexus has risen rapidly in global water governance over the past decade. This article examines the role of global financial networks in articulating the nexus and in connecting it to sustainability programs. It provides new insights into critical engagements with the nexus that, to date, have focused predominantly on water security and governance. The article examines how global financial networks conceptualized and concretized the nexus towards two ends: First, the nexus was used to effect the transition from state-oriented development models to financialized approaches of water development and sustainability. Here, the nexus was formulated in critique of, and as a solution to, the previously dominant approach to water development: integrated water resources management (IWRM). Second, the nexus was deployed to connect water, energy, food, and climate to the global economy in terms of complex systems. The identification of risks to the resilience of environmental and economic systems provided a new form of integration across the supply chains affected by the governance and security of water, energy, food, and climate. In both cases, the nexus mobilizes technologies of global finance, such as credit-risk ratings, to construct and defend new strategies for governing water security and to enable sub-sovereign actors, such as municipalities, to be incorporated into the global economy. The paper concludes that alignments of the nexus with sustainability programs, and the Sustainable Development Goals, must be reconsidered in view of the constraints posed by financial orientations towards the risks and resilience of economic and environmental systems.