Amazing triple set of resources on Indigenous waters: from Standing Rock to Australia (book + 2 special issues)

There are three recent (and really good) resources that have come out on Indigenous waters in the past several weeks: a book and two special issues, each below and many open access.

Standing With Standing Rock: Voices from the #NoDAPL Movement (University of Minnesota Press)

From the Publisher Website:

image_miniIt is prophecy. A Black Snake will spread itself across the land, bringing destruction while uniting Indigenous nations. The Dakota Access Pipeline is the Black Snake, crossing the Missouri River north of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. The oil pipeline united communities along its path—from North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Illinois—and galvanized a twenty-first-century Indigenous resistance movement marching under the banner Mni Wiconi—Water Is Life! Standing Rock youth issued a call, and millions around the world and thousands of Water Protectors from more than three hundred Native nations answered. Amid the movement to protect the land and the water that millions depend on for life, the Oceti Sakowin (the Dakota, Nakota, and Lakota people) reunited. A nation was reborn with renewed power to protect the environment and support Indigenous grassroots education and organizing. This book assembles the multitude of voices of writers, thinkers, artists, and activists from that movement.

Through poetry and prose, essays, photography, interviews, and polemical interventions, the contributors, including leaders of the Standing Rock movement, reflect on Indigenous history and politics and on the movement’s significance. Their work challenges our understanding of colonial history not simply as “lessons learned” but as essential guideposts for current and future activism.

Transformative Water Relations: Indigenous Interventions in Global Political Economies

This is a special, open-access issue in the journal Global Environmental Politics [click here if the direct links below are off]. It is edited by Kate Neville and Glen Coulthard and includes pieces from many scholars that are part of the Decolonizing Water project.

There are six articles, here are the titles/authors.

Kate J. Neville and Glen Coulthard
Including Indigenous Knowledge Systems in Environmental Assessments: Restructuring the Process, Rachel Arsenault, Carrie Bourassa, Sibyl Diver, Deborah McGregor, and Aaron Witham

Indigenous water management

This is a special issue in the Australasian Journal of Environmental Managment  and it is edited by Sue Jackson and Bradley Moggridge (Not all of it is open access but the lead article is…at least it was when I posted this).

Indigenous water management, Sue Jackson & Bradley Moggridge
Indigenous nation building for environmental futures: Murrundi flows through Ngarrindjeri country, Steve Hemming, Daryle Rigney, Simone Bignall, Shaun Berg & Grant Rigney

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