Grasping Sustainability: A Debate on Resilience Theory versus Political Ecology

This is an interesting debate between Garry Peterson (Stockholm Resilience Centre) and Alf Hornborg (Lund).

Advertisements

Brian Walker: Resilience, the Anthropocene and Evolution

Webinar from POLIS Water Project now online

The video and information below can also be found here from the webinar on Global Networks and Governance Innovation: Tools for Resilient Watersheds.

“In this webinar, the guest speakers discuss challenges and opportunities for building resilience within watersheds. It focuses on the importance of global networks for driving new innovation processes and improving resilience in our watersheds. It explores the challenges and benefits that transnational relationships bring for watershed-based organizations, and the role of social “traps” during disasters and how they can affect the capacity to build resilience across sectors within a watershed.

GUEST SPEAKERS

Michele-Lee Moore
Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Victoria
Director, Water, Innovation, and Global Governance Lab (WIGG)
Research Associate & Strategic Faculty Advisor, POLIS Water Sustainability Project

Frances Westley
Waterloo Institute of Social Innovation and Resilience
JW McConnell Chair in Social Innovation, University of Waterloo”

Resilience as an operating system in the anthropocene

Garry Peterson’s recently re-circulated this post at the resilience science blog; very interesting, especially as a response to the New York Times article on replacing ‘sustainability’ with ‘resilience.’

Resilience as an operating system for sustainability in the anthropocene

Chris Turner, author of Geography of Hope: A Tour of the World We Need, writing in the Walrus about the Anthropocene and the coral reef crisis in his long article Age of Breathing Underwater:

I first heard tell of “resilience” — not as a simple descriptive term but as the cornerstone of an entire ecological philosophy — just a couple of days before I met Charlie Veron on the pages of Melbourne’s most respected newspaper. I was onstage for the opening session of the Alfred Deakin Innovation Lectures in an auditorium at the University of Ballarat at the time. The evening had begun with a literal lament — a grieving folk song performed by an aboriginal musician. I’d then presented a slide show of what I considered to be the rough contours of an Anthropocene map of hope, after which a gentleman I’d just met, a research fellow at Australia’s prestigious Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation named Brian Walker, placed my work in the broader context of resilience theory.

READ MORE HERE