Patchy Anthropocene: Special Issue from Current Anthropology

I’m sure my ‘copy-and-paste’ will have some issues below [or not! many of the links seem to be working properly], so the direct link to this interesting set of papers is here. The special issue in Current Anthropology is titled “Patchy Anthropocene: Frenzies and Afterlives of Violent Simplifications” and looks to be open-access so far as I can tell.

 

Free AccessPatchy Anthropocene: Frenzies and Afterlives of Violent Simplifications: Wenner-Gren Symposium Supplement 20

Danilyn Rutherford

pp. S183–S185

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Introduction
Free AccessPatchy Anthropocene: Landscape Structure, Multispecies History, and the Retooling of Anthropology: An Introduction to Supplement 20

Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing, Andrew S. Mathews, and Nils Bubandt

pp. S186–S197

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Landscape Structure: Reading Extinction and Toxicity
Free AccessLearning to Read the Great Chernobyl Acceleration: Literacy in the More-than-Human Landscapes

Kate Brown

pp. S198–S208

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Free AccessThe Tree Snail Manifesto

Michael G. Hadfield and Donna J. Haraway

pp. S209–S235

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Modular Simplification and Feral Proliferation: Inhabiting Nondesigned Effects
Free AccessCoffee Landscapes Shaping the Anthropocene: Forced Simplification on a Complex Agroecological Landscape

Ivette Perfecto, M. Estelí Jiménez-Soto, and John Vandermeer

pp. S236–S250

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Free AccessLivestock Revolution and Ghostly Apparitions: South China as a Sentinel Territory for Influenza Pandemics

Frédéric Keck

pp. S251–S259

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Free AccessCattle, Capital, Colonization: Tracking Creatures of the Anthropocene In and Out of Human Projects

Rosa E. Ficek

pp. S260–S271

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Systems and Their Limits: Thinking with Models
Free AccessAn Unexpected Politics of Population: Salmon Counting, Science, and Advocacy in the Columbia River Basin

Heather Anne Swanson

pp. S272–S285

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Free AccessBeing Affected by Sinking Deltas: Changing Landscapes, Resilience, and Complex Adaptive Systems in the Scientific Story of the Anthropocene

Atsuro Morita and Wakana Suzuki

pp. S286–S295

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Free AccessOn Models and Examples: Engineers and Bricoleurs in the Anthropocene

Eduardo Viveiros de Castro

pp. S296–S308

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Radical Hope: On Not Giving Up
Free AccessPlants, Politics, and the Imagination over the Past 500 Years in the Indo-Malay Region

Michael R. Dove

pp. S309–S320

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Free AccessFilthy Flourishing: Para-Sites, Animal Infrastructure, and the Waste Frontier in Kampala

Jacob Doherty

pp. S321–S332

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Beyond Man/Change/Earth: Imagining Otherwise
Free AccessAt Play with the Giants: Between the Patchy Anthropocene and Romantic Geology

Naveeda Khan

pp. S333–S341

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Free AccessFarming Odd Kin in Patchy Anthropocenes

Yen-Ling Tsai

pp. S342–S353

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New Book: Andreas Malm’s, How to Blow Up a Pipeline

Latest from Andreas Malm moves from his initial work in history (Fossil Capital), to the polemical conceptual book (Progress of this Storm) to a call for civil disobedience.

From the Publisher’s website:

9781839760259Property will cost us the earth

The science on climate change has been clear for a very long time now. Yet despite decades of appeals, mass street protests, petition campaigns, and peaceful demonstrations, we are still facing a booming fossil fuel industry, rising seas, rising emission levels, and a rising temperature. With the stakes so high, why haven’t we moved beyond peaceful protest?

In this lyrical manifesto, noted climate scholar (and saboteur of SUV tires and coal mines) Andreas Malm makes an impassioned call for the climate movement to escalate its tactics in the face of ecological collapse. We need, he argues, to force fossil fuel extraction to stop–with our actions, with our bodies, and by defusing and destroying its tools. We need, in short, to start blowing up some oil pipelines.

Offering a counter-history of how mass popular change has occurred, from the democratic revolutions overthrowing dictators to the movement against apartheid and for women’s suffrage, Malm argues that the strategic acceptance of property destruction and violence has been the only route for revolutionary change. In a braided narrative that moves from the forests of Germany and the streets of London to the deserts of Iraq, Malm offers us an incisive discussion of the politics and ethics of pacifism and violence, democracy and social change, strategy and tactics, and a movement compelled by both the heart and the mind. Here is how we fight in a world on fire.