Launch of Anthropocene Primer: open access platform

OFFICIAL LAUNCH OF DIGITAL OPEN ACCESS PUBLICATION AN ANTHROPOCENE PRIMER, Version 1.0
 
October 23, 2017
The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute is proud to announce the official launch of An

Anthropocene Primer, Version 1.0 on October 23, 2017. An Anthropocene Primer is an
innovative open access, open peer review publication that guides learners through the complex

concepts and debates related to the Anthropocene, including climate change, pollution, and

environmental justice.
This born-digital publication (www.anthropoceneprimer.org) is a critical and timely resource for learners across multiple fields from academia, to industry, to philanthropy to learn about issues and topics relating to the Anthropocene, a framework for understanding environmental change that highlights human impact on earth systems.
An Anthropocene Primer was created to provide learners in museums, schools, non-profits, and formal research institutions with an entry point into some of the big concepts and debates that dominate discussions about the Anthropocene. The primer is not intended to be comprehensive (this is, after all, An Anthropocene Primer, not The Anthropocene Primer), nor is it intended to be didactic. The primer is a framework to guide individual and collaborative learning from the
beginner to advanced levels.
Version 1.0 of An Anthropocene Primer is available for open peer review from October 23, 2017 through February 1, 2018. Open peer review allows users to contribute to and engage with fellow readers and the authors as the editors develop it for a final print and open access ebook version. A video tutorial on how to participate in open peer review is available at www.anthropoceneprimer.org/index.php/videotutorials/.
Edited by Jason M. Kelly and Fiona P. McDonald, An Anthropocene Primer emerged from the “Anthropology of the Anthropocene” workshop (http://www.anthropologyoftheanthropocene.org) hosted by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in May 2017. The participants from this workshop make up list of authors: Jason M. Kelly (IUPUI, USA), Fiona P. McDonald (IUPUI, USA), Alejandro Camargo (University of Montreal, Canada), Amelia Moore (University of Rhode Island, USA), Mark Kesling (The daVinci Pursuit, USA), Ananya Ghoshal (Forum on Contemporary Theory, India), George Marcus (University of California, Irvine, USA), Paul Stoller (West Chester University, USA), Dominic Boyer (Rice University, USA), Serenella Iovino (University of Turin, Italy), Rebecca Ballestra (Artist, Monaco/Italy), Eduardo S. Brondizio (IU, Bloomington), Jim Enote (A:shiwiw A:wan Museum and Heritage Center, Zuni, USA), Ignatius Gutsa (University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe), Cymene Howe (Rice University, USA), Sue Jackson (Griffith University, Australia), Phil Scarpino (IUPUI, USA). This workshop was funded by the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grant program.
Summary
An Anthropocene Primer is an innovative open access, open peer review publication that guides learners through the complex concepts and debates related to the Anthropocene, including climate change, pollution, and environmental justice.
Related Hashtags:
#iahi
#anthropoceneprimer
#anthropocene
#humanities
#environment
#openaccess
#socialscience
#collaboration
#iupui
 
Contacts:
 
Jason M. Kelly
Director, IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute
Associate Professor of History
IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute
Indianapolis, IN 46202
@jason_m_kelly
Fiona P. McDonald
Postdoctoral Researcher, IUPUI Arts &
Humanities Institute
IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute
Indianapolis, IN 46202
@fionapmcdonald
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