Special issue on water in Radical History Review

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116

Water: History, Power, Crisis

Volume 2013, Number 116, Spring 2013 Issue Editors David Kinkela, Teresa Meade, and Enrique Ochoa

Editors’ Introduction

    • David Kinkela,
    • Teresa Meade,
    • and Enrique Ochoa

    Editors’ Introduction

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 1-4; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965651

Features

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    • Stephanie Tam

    Sewerage’s Reproduction of Caste: The Politics of Coprology in Ahmedabad, India

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 5-30; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965675

  • Select this article
    • Hugh McDonnell

    Water, North African Immigrants, and the Parisian Bidonvilles, 1950s – 1960s

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 31-58; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965684

  • Select this article
    • Claire Cookson-Hills

    The Aswan Dam and Egyptian Water Control Policy, 1882 – 1902

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 59-85; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965693

  • Select this article
    • Maria Teresa Armijos

    “They Cannot Come and Impose on Us”: Indigenous Autonomy and Resource Control through Collective Water Management in Highland Ecuador

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 86-103; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965702

Reflections

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    • Ruth A. Morgan and
    • James L. Smith

    Premodern Streams of Thought in Twenty-First-Century Water Management

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 105-129; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965748

  • Select this article
    • Nicole Fabricant and
    • Kathryn Hicks

    Bolivia’s Next Water War: Historicizing the Struggles over Access to Water Resources in the Twenty-First Century

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 130-145; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965757

Curated Spaces

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    • Nicolas Lampert and
    • Raoul Deal

    Watershed: Art, Activism, and Community Engagement

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 147-158; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965829

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    • Nancy Borowick

    Stories of Water

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 159-166; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965838

Teaching Radical History

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    • Robert A. Gilmer

    Coursing through the Spill: Notes on Teaching Environmental Justice and Making the Academy Responsive to Contemporary Issues

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 167-188; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965865

(Re)Views

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    • Erik Loomis

    The Global Water Crisis: Privatization and Neocolonialism in Film

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 189-195; doi:10.1215/01636545-1965880

    A World without Water. DVD. Directed by Brian Woods. 2006. London: True Visions Production.
    Blue Gold: World Water Wars. DVD. Directed by Sam Bozzo. 2008. Irvine, CA: Purple Turtle Films.
    Mumbai: Liquid City. DVD. Directed by Matthew Gandy. 2008. London: UCL Urban Laboratory.
    También la Lluvia (Even the Rain). Directed by Bollaín Icíar. 2010. Los Angeles: Vitagraph Films.

Remembrance

    • Teresa Meade

    Eric Hobsbawm, 1917 – 2012

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 197-198; doi:10.1215/01636545-2153549

Notes on Contributors

  • Notes on Contributors

    Radical History Review Spring 2013 2013(116): 199-201; doi:10.1215/01636545-2153560

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Water Alternatives maps its publications

To celebrate 1 000 000 views the open access journal, Water Alternatives, has mapped out all of the case studies its articles cover so that you can search visually for topics you might be interested in. All it takes to access articles is making a profile.

Water alternatives

Alberta, Open Sewers and the Keystone Pipeline

I have been interested lately in how the Canadian government has completely lost control of the discourse over its oil resources. It started with a very tightly scripted campaign for “ethical oil” a few years back, but today both the script and the actors involved (i.e. Canadian ministers at the provincial and federal levels) appear as so many industry touts. So it is a double loss. On the one side it is a loss because any long-term viability for developing oil resources is now in jeopardy as all sides converge to wage war against “dirty oil”. On the other, the development that is proceeding is under less and less scrutiny internally, and so the government (and by extension the public) are in a much weaker position than they were just a few short years ago.